Yale University Art Gallery

About this Venue

The Yale University Art Gallery is the oldest college art museum in America. The Gallery’s encyclopedic holdings of more than 200,000 objects range from ancient times to the present day, and represent civilizations from around the globe. The Gallery is FREE and open to the public.

Where to Park


159 York Street, New Haven
Open 7am-2am on Fri & Sat, 7am-12am Sun-Thurs
Entrance at: York Street between Crown and Chapel
This structure: Centrally located for ticketed Festival events and Ideas events at the University Theatre, Iseman Theatre, Yale Repertory Theatre, Yale University Art Gallery, and Yale Center for British Art. More info
Rate: $5 flat rate with Festival Parking Coupon

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Street Parking

Metered street parking in downtown New Haven is available, but limited: parking in a garage with the Festival coupon is often cheaper and easier than trying to find street parking! Check all posted signs and be sure that you have paid your meter accordingly. Also check for temporary restrictions to street parking near your vehicle: summertime often brings construction to the area, and some parking regulations may be temporarily changed.

Please note: Metered parking is in effect until 9pm, Monday through Saturday. There is a 2 hour limit from 8am-5pm, and no limit after 5pm. No parking restrictions on Sunday

More Festival parking options

Occurring at this venue

Join two of the exhibition curators, Paola D’Agostino, the Nina and Lee Griggs Assistant Curator of European Art, Yale University Art Gallery, and Izabel Gass, Graduate Research Assistant, Yale Uni

A Close Look at the Collection

Join us for an in-depth, close look at works in the collection.

Join our educators for an interactive tour of the Gallery’s history, architecture, and encyclopedic collection.

with Mary McBride

In this event, Mary will give us a window onto her work, particularly her current initiative with young adults at Connecticut Mental Health Center and participating local mental health and housing facilities.

Go behind the scenes of the American Decorative Arts Furniture Study, the Gallery’s working library of American furniture and wooden objects, which features more than 1,000 works from the 17th to the 21st century.

Award-winning cartoonist Roz Chast discusses and shows her drawings from The New Yorker and from her acclaimed graphic novel, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Race and democracy in the age of Ferguson and Baltimore

Journalist and University of Connecticut history professor Jelani Cobb discusses citizenship in an age of expanded state authority. How much power should we afford those who keep us safe?

An Andrew Carnduff Ritchie Lecture

Mike Leigh, director of Mr. Turner, will discuss his acclaimed film with Jackie Riding, independent art historian and advisor on the film.

Doors open 1 hour prior to start time

How does the way we think about equity and justice in health affect health in Africa and across the world and set the stage for epidemic such has the one we've seen emerge over the past year?

Claudia Rankine will discuss her lauded book Citizen: An American Lyric, an archival and curatorial project that makes present race in American life and fixes our gaze on the network of concrete and abstract forces threatening black bodies.

This celebration of the life and work of Frank Sinatra will explore his influence on American music and art.

Doors open 1 hour prior to start time

Author and The New York Times senior health and science reporter Gina Kolata will look at new cultural, medical and social perspectives on longevity and aging in our contemporary era.

How have uniquely urban platforms for art changed our cities, our audiences, our very lives? How might they continue to do so in the future?

Learn about the life and artistic development of James Abbott McNeill Whistler, one of the most celebrated artists of the 19th century, by looking closely with exhibition curator Heather Nolin at h